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Hi, I have a question regarding vegan and vegetarian diets and copper toxicity. Is it true that such diets that do not include red meat and other animal foods in significant amounts can lead to coper toxicity? There is one doctor in particular who seems to be the source of this belief. Here are a few quotes from him:


" COPPER AND VEGETARIAN DIETS Zinc is found mainly in meats.For this reason, vegetarian diets are higher in copper and lower in zinc.Those who follow vegetarian diets tend to accumulate too much copper in the body, which often shortens their lives, even if they feel very well during their entire lives.


Obligatory vegetarians.Dr. Eck discussed the idea that sometimes people become vegetarian due to the buildup of excess copper in the body.Excess copper interferes with zinc, a mineral needed to make digestive enzymes.Too much copper also impairs thyroid activity and the functioning of the liver.If severe enough, a person will become an obligatory vegetarian.This means they are no longer able to digest meat very well.The taste for meat often returns when copper is brought into better balance with a nutritional balancing program.Other reasons for following a vegetarian diet include one’s philosophy about eating animals, dislike for how animals are slaughtered, or other reasons.Some are born with a distaste for meat.No matter what the outward reason, however, at times a hidden buildup of copper – even at birth – is, in fact, part or all of the reason a person takes an interest in a vegetarian diet.


Symptoms.At times, the vegetarian orientation is health-producing, temporarily.Many people associate vegetarianism with eliminating refined flour and refined sugar, and this aspect is positive.However, in most people, however, meat-restricted diets do not work well.Fatigue, spaciness and other symptoms begin to appear.Many people, including the author, felt they were becoming more “spiritual” on a vegetarian diet, when in fact it was just copper poisoning!Some people with high copper dislike all protein.They crave high-carbohydrate diets.Protein feels heavy or causes other symptoms.Eating protein stimulates glandular activity.This releases stored copper, which causes the symptoms.However, these individuals usually need to eat protein, and their symptoms will eventually disappear as their health improves.For much more on vegetarian diets, please readVegetarianismon this website. " (http://drlwilson.com/articles/copper_toxicity_syndrome.htm#OTHSYMPTOMS) Do you believe there is any validity to what this doctor says? He also goes into other reasons on why being vegetarian, and even worse vegan, in his view, is harmful (http://drlwilson.com/articles/VEGETABLEDIETS.htm)


 

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Sean Carney Accepted Answer
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I am not sure if you are asking an honest question or just trying to post links to the pages of Lawrence Wilson, MD who has been debunked over and over. Do a search for the following: Lawrence Wilson, MD debunked


I am tempted to say more but think that in this case silence might be golden.


Sean

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  1. more than a month ago
  2. Miscellaneous Issues
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Martha Helene Jones Accepted Answer
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I too became interested in this subject because my son who now has his doctorate in physics from NCSU was involved in and co-published a research paper in Nature magazine on protien folding from copper in the brain in Parkinson's. https://news.ncsu.edu/2011/06/tp-rose/


So I took special note of Dr. Michael Greger's video on copper toxicity in the brain. http://nutritionfacts.org/video/alzheimers-disease-copper-and-saturated-fat/


Following are excerpts from Dr. Gregor's transcript or yo;u could watch it yourself at the link above.


“Organ meats and shellfish are the richest food sources of copper. But should we also consider cutting down on plant sources, such as nuts, seeds, legumes, and whole grains? Copper intake only seems to be a problem when consumed with saturated fat or transfat.


In the Chicago Health and Aging Project, thousands of elderly Chicagoans were followed for six years. Those who were getting the highest copper doses, largely from multivitamin supplements, combined with a diet high in saturated fats, lost cognition as if they had aged 19 years in a period of six years, tripling their rate of cognitive dcecline. But copper intake was not associated with cognitive change when the diet was not also high in saturated fats.


Diet-induced high cholesterol has been shown to increase the formation and progression of amyloid plaques in the brain. And dietary copper may interfere with clearance of amyloid from the brain, and may further promote the plaque accumulation that results from elevated cholesterol levels. Copper has been shown to interact badly with amyloid, causing its clumping and the production of hydrogen peroxide, a potent pro-oxidant neurotoxin.


This may help explain why the higher the levels of copper, the quicker Alzheimer’s disease may progress, particularly among people with high cholesterol levels.


This is what we think may be happening. As cholesterol and copper levels rise, cholesterol is incorporated into the nerve cell membrane, causing it to stiffen. The amyloid protein in the membrane detaches to form plaques, at which point, iron and copper generate neurotoxic free radicals. Inside the cell, similar havoc is created, and finally cholesterol-enriched diets can lead to nerve cell death, DNA damage, and blood-brain barrier disruption.


In conclusion, the present systematic review suggests that a diet rich in copper and iron might aggravate the detrimental effects of a high intake of cholesterol and saturated fat on the risk of developing Alzheimer’s disease. So, diets rich in saturated fat and deficient in antioxidants appear to promote the onset of the disease, while more plant-based diets would likely suppress its onset. There are compounds in plant foods that not only scavenge free radicals and prevent oxidative damage, but are also known to chelate, or bind up, metals, potentially making them additionally be protective against the onset of Alzheimer’s.”



Hope this helps, Martha Helene Jones

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  1. more than a month ago
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Ana Pirs Accepted Answer
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Hi!

I want to recommend a good recipe - Vegan Zucchini Bread

Really Tasty and Healthy!

Try!)

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  1. more than a month ago
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